Friday, December 12, 2008

Great post on following the prophets when the subject is not popular with the rest of the world

All of the resentment and frustration with the LDS Church's support of various moral issues struck a chord with me when I was reading the Book of Mormon in Alma 48:10  when Moroni was leading the people against opposition forces who were trying to usurp and destroy the people's liberties, it says:

"Alma 48: 10 And thus he[Moroni] was preparing to asupport their liberty, their lands, their wives, and their children, and their peace, and that they might live unto the Lord their God, and that they might maintain that which was called by their enemies the cause of bChristians." (emphasis added)

I find it ironic how similar the comments are nowadays when Christians stand up against forces that would take away our freedom's; freedom to bring our children up the way we see, freedom to be free of morally relative persuasions in our schools, freedom to follow tried and true age old traditions that are the bedrock of functional and healthy society's like the traditional family and traditional marriage. 

I ran across the following blog post that had elements of several common threads and referenced a talk on Loyalty to the prophets I had posted on as well, it's a well written and very well documented commentary, I highly recommend it:

http://www.divideasunder.org/2008/12/proposition-8/

1 comment:

Scott said...

Moroni's case is an interesting one, because on the one hand, he clearly stood for the individual and collective liberty of his people, but also was one of the few characters to engage in a form of "defense" that seemed to be a "with us or against us" mentality. Obviously, we don't have Moroni here with us to say exactly what the circumstances were in his day, but I think it's an interesting question anyway:

As Latter-day Saints, it is a fact of life that we will run into citizens of the same town, state, and country who prefer vastly different policies than our own--even (or especially!) non-Christian policies. The question is, how do you maintain liberty for both parties?

Affirming only the rights of the Christians without solutions that involve protecting the liberties of those we oppose politically is a dangerous path.